Category Archives: Literature

“Somewhere In Time”

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“Somewhere in Time”

Today I am sitting on a tree branch on Skyline Street

which might as well be the lobby of a hotel in Mackinaw Island,

watching the children toss their toys at the trampoline.

I am dreaming of my golden dress again

and the store in Gloria where I will be fitted for the future.

A small boy and I recognize each other

from our past life spent together in Alexandria.

He and I weep over the velvety robes, the looming statues and the

fallen triangles,

and collapse upon the hot sand

remembering the Ancient Library

and the faded walls

with the richest culture.

We will meet again in 2,000 years

when this is all figured out.

We will both need that much time,

based on the history past,

the loss of antique arts and the tarnished pearl.

I give it at least two millennia

before the ground embraces us together in the sand

and we become one in the next age.

I wrote this is 2010 with inspiration from a poem by Gerald Stern for a Creative Writing assignment. It was published in Aquinas College’s The Sampler.

Sonnet CXVI by William Shakespeare

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Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come:
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

-William Shakespeare

This is featured in a book of Jackie Kennedy-Onassis’s most beloved poems. I first came across it when Keegan was living in Cleveland, and we have  framed picture of it in our family room.

“The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost

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Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads onto way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh,
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--
I took the road less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

The effect of this poem cannot be put into words–let alone by me. I memorized it at 13 years old and have carried it close to my heart ever since.